Food for thought:


(This is an excerpt from a blog I wrote about the growing conflict in the clinical diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and how it relates to CCSVI,  trauma,Chlamydia pneumoniae,vitamin and mineral deficiencies and other causal factors in both MS and  CCSVI.)745056-fig2Probiotics_Info_from_siteshapeimage_9SpirochetesEx2[1]

Now that Lyme has become a hot topic, people are demanding better testing facilities. A fair number of people previously diagnosed with MS have learned they have Lyme Disease. That is another factor in the growing suspicion that MS as it is globally defined, is not a disease at all but rather a term used to pigeon hole people into a generic box of symptoms. Interestingly enough, some of these people also have CCSVI and been treated successfully with angioplasty.

This has been a fascinating puzzle for me but I have finally come to make some sense of it. Most venous anomalies are congenital, not to be confused with hereditary. Ten people can be bitten by ticks who harbor the spirochetes that cause Lyme disease. Statistically speaking less than half of them will actually develop the disease, other health issues not withstanding. We are beginning to get a clearer picture of “MS” with in depth review of the facts we have learned about CCSVI over the past several years. The narrow view that CCSVI is confined to PwMS has been blown out of the water. Some patients with other neurological disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and Alzheimer’s disease meet the criteria for CCSVI also. It’s no wonder that people are confused by the diverse laundry list of symptoms among those in the MS community.

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